The calls of 11 new leaders were announced at the April 2021 general conference. These calls comprise eight General Authority Seventies and a new Primary General Presidency. Earlier this week, 77 new Area Seventies were announced at a leadership meeting.

President Dallin H. Oaks of the First Presidency of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints announced the calls during the Saturday afternoon session of the conference. He also announced the release of six Area Seventies.

Below are links to more information about these leaders:

New General Authority Seventies

General Authority Seventies serve in the Presidency of the Seventy, in area presidencies and in other headquarters administrative functions. Under the direction of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, they travel frequently to meet with and teach Church leaders, missionaries and members of the Church in local congregations. They have authority to serve anywhere in the world, while the authority

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Downloadable photos and video for journalists from various sessions
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President Dallin H. Oaks of the First Presidency of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints announced the calls of nine new General Authority Seventies and 58 Area Seventies during the Saturday afternoon session of the April 2020 general conference. He also announced a new Young Men General Presidency to replace Brother Stephen W. Owen, Brother Douglas D. Holmes and Brother M. Joseph Brough, who have served as a presidency for five years. Brother Steven J. Lund is the new president, with Brother Ahmad Corbitt and Brother Bradley (Brad) R. Wilcox as his counselors.

Below are links to biographical information for the new leaders:

 

New General Authority Seventies

General Authority Seventies serve in the Presidency of the Seventy, in

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Lynn G. Robbins, son of Evelyn Reed and Joshua Grant Robbins, was born on October 27, 1952, in Payson, Utah, but grew up in the nearby town of Springville. Robbins describes his own youth as “Huck Finn” in nature, having spent his time outside exploring and playing numerous sports. Jan Neilson, who lived next to his grandmother and aunt, was one of his close childhood friends, and during their senior year of high school, he asked her on a date. Later, Jan wrote him 104 letters—one for each week he served in the Argentina North Mission. They were married in the Manti Temple on June 27, 1972, eight months after he returned home. The two would later become parents to seven children.

After their marriage, the couple relocated to Logan, Utah, and attended Utah State University. Robbins studied food science and business administration in order to pursue a restaurant career;

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The Joseph Smith Memorial Building was originally called the Hotel Utah. It was finished in 1911 and was built to bring a world-class hotel to Salt Lake City. The opulent Beaux Arts hotel was designed by architectural firm Parkinson and Bergstrom. The building was operated as a hotel for more than 75 years, receiving guests from all over the globe—from international leaders, presidents, and scholars to leading figures in the world of art, music, sports, and entertainment.

The Hotel Utah finished its hospitality operations in 1987, and the building was then adapted for other purposes. It reopened in 1993 for office and meeting space operated by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. It also provides space for public event hosting and dining options. A local Latter-day Saint congregation holds its services in the building every Sunday, and guests are welcome to attend.

The lobby features artistic columns, open

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Today is literally one of the highlights of my life. My soul is filled with joy and thanksgiving. From the time I was a little boy, the opening day of school has always been one of excitement and anticipation. It is for this reason that a high point of my years as president of BYU has been the opportunity for Janet and me to share some thoughts with you at the beginning of each fall semester.

This one, of course—for reasons Brother Hafen has explained—is also laden with an extra element of emotion. It is our seventh September devotional, and we realize that it will be our last. I have appreciated more than words can tell the expressions of support, loyalty, and love that I have received from you, and I want you to know how deeply Janet and I care for each of you and the great hopes that

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A prestigious economist, professor, administrator, and a General Authority for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Kim B. Clark sets a powerful example of putting service to God first. He knows the importance of spiritual and secular education for individuals as well as families, communities, nations, and the Church.

Kim Bryce Clark was born March 20, 1949 in Salt Lake City, Utah, and raised in Spokane, Washington. He began his education at Harvard University, matriculating to serve a mission in Germany. When he returned, he spent some time at Brigham Young University. There he met Sue Hunt in a family home evening group, and they were married in 1971. He says he is sure that she is the reason he needed to come to BYU: “She is the love of my life, and I came here to find her.” They have now been married many happy years and

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Many BYU students have been prepared to form moral premises. This preparation has come from the teaching of parents, Sunday School classes, sacrament meeting talks, seminary courses, scripture reading, and private tutorials received from the Holy Ghost.

Several years ago I visited an isolated oasis deep in the Gobi Desert in China. Some 80 miles from the nearest town, the oasis was in a small canyon that had been occupied by a handful of Buddhist monks for hundreds of years. In this incredibly isolated spot, the monks could avoid the temptations of the world and focus only on Buddhist teachings. In Latter-day Saint terms, these monks were trying to flee Babylon.

Most of us have elected not to dwell in total isolation but to live in the civilized world. This decision requires us to interact daily with the world and to face the challenge of doing business in Babylon even

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